Timeline of Victorian Loughborough

22 May 2020

1837:
VICTORIA BECOMES QUEEN

EMMANUEL CHURCH on FOREST ROAD is built at a cost of £7,000. For some years, this marked LOUGHBOROUGH’s “border” with CHARNWOOD FOREST.

The “LOUGHBOROUGH TELEGRAPH”, LOUGHBOROUGH’s earliest known newspaper, begins publication.

1838:
A new workhouse opens on DERBY ROAD, built at a cost of £7,000. It had room for 375 inmates.

EMMANUEL BOYS SCHOOL on WARDS END and EMMANUEL GIRLS SCHOOL on BEDFORD SQUARE are founded.

1839:
JOHN TAYLOR first comes to LOUGHBOROUGH to recast the ten bells of the Parish Church. He establishes a branch of the firm in Pack Horse Lane. Two extra bells are also added, making a peal of eight.

Thirty coaches a day now change horses at LOUGHBOROUGH

1840:
Opening of the MIDLAND COUNTIES RAILWAY in LOUGHBOROUGH. The first train passed through the town on May 4th.

The town’s first Post Office is run from an Inn at the corner of Market Place and Swan Street, known as the Corner Cupboard.

1841:
THOMAS COOK’s first railway excursion from LEICESTER to LOUGHBOROUGH.

The population of LOUGHBOROUGH is 10,170.

1842:
TUDOR HOUSE on WOODGATE becomes a Rosminian Convent.

1845:
ALL SAINTS CHURCH is built in THORPE ACRE.

THOMAS DENNING leaves the Lordship of the Manor of LOUGHBOROUGH to THOMAS CRADOCK in his will.

1848:
HENRY FEARON becomes Rector of ALL SAINTS PARISH CHURCH.

The parish of LOUGHBOROUGH splits into two separate parishes of ALL SAINTS and EMMANUEL.

HOLYWELL HALL is bought by Charles March Phillips.

CHARTIST leader FEARGUS O’CONNOR is prevented from speaking in the MARKET PLACE, provoking a near riot.

The SPARROW HILL THEATRE closes as a theatre.

There is an outbreak of cholera in the town.

HENRY CLEMERSON’S ironmongery shop opens in MILL STREET (now MARKET STREET), beginning a long association with the town.

1849:
LOUGHBOROUGH registers an exceptionally high death rate of 23 per 1,000.

William Lee, Superintendant Inspector of the General Board of Health, conducts an enquiry into the problems of LOUGHBOROUGH’s public health.

A small METHODIST CHAPEL is built on SWAN STREET.

1850:
The Rosminian Convent in WOODGATE moves to PARK ROAD and becomes OR LADY’S CONVENT.

SHELTHORPE COTTAGE (now The Cedars Restaurant) built for C Middleton of MIDDLETON’S BANK.

CHESTERTON HOUSE in Rectory Place becomes the first GIRLS’ GRAMMAR SCHOOL in the country.

The foundation stone of the LOUGHBOROUGH GRAMMAR SCHOOL is laid in BURTON WALKS by George Davys, Bishop of Peterborough (a native of LOUGHBOROUGH).

The LOUGHBOROUGH BOARD OF HEALTH is formed.

GRUDGINGS NEEDLE FACTORY opens in WOODGATE.

1851:
WILLIAM COTTON first patents his steam powered hosiery making machinery.

The HICKLING BLUE COAT SCHOOL opens it’s own premises on Ashby Road.

The population of LOUGHBOROUGH is 11,339.

1852:
The THOMAS BURTON GRAMMAR SCHOOL moves from CHURCH GATE to it’s present site in BURTON WALKS. By the end of the year, there are 91 boys on the school roll.

EMMANUEL INFANTS SCHOOL opens in VICTORIA STREET.

1855:
The LOUGHBOROUGH TOWN HALL and CORN EXCHANGE open in the MARKET PLACE, built at a cost of £8,812.

1856:
LOUGHBOROUGH BURIAL BOARD is established.

1857:
The town’s first drainage system is installed and gas lighting is introduced.

Demonstrations at PARLIAMENTARY HUSTINGS in the MARKET PLACE provoke the reading of the RIOT ACT and the charging of the crowd by police.

The CEMETERY opens on Leicester Road

The LOUGHBOROUGH MONITOR begins publication.

1859:
TAYLOR’S BELL FOUNDRY moves from Pack Horse Lane to FREEHOLD STREET.

1860:
The LOUGHBOROUGH POLICE STATION and COURTS open in WOODGATE at a cost of £2,500, paid for out of the county rates. Prior to this, courts were often held in the PLOUGH INN on the MARKET PLACE.

HENRY HUGHES AND CO LOCOMOTIVE WORKS opens, later to become FALCON ENGINEERING.

LOUGHBOROUGH POST OFFICE moves to MILL STREET (now MARKET STREET)

1861:
The “LOUGHBOROUGH NEWS” is first printed.

The population of LOUGHBOROUGH is 10,935.

1862:
A voluntary subscription PUBLIC DISPENSARY opens in BAXTER GATE, forming the core of today’s hospital.

£9,000 worth of restoration is carried out in the Parish Church, including the removal of all galleries, the high-backed pews and the triple-decker pulpit. There is now seating for 1,000 people. The gravestones are removed from the floor and replaced in the graveyard. W PERRY HERRICK of BEAUMANOR pays £1,000 to restore the tower.

1863:
THOMAS CRADOCK dies and is succeeded as Lord of the Manor of LOUGHBOROUGH by his son, JOHN DAVYS CRADOCK.

1864:
WILLIAM COTTON patents his new power loom.

The new UNITARIAN CHAPEL is built in VICTORIA STREET.

1866:
A FIRE STATION is built on Ashby Road.

1868:
First edition of the LOUGHBOROUGH ADVERTISER. This is later absorbed into the LOUGHBOROUGH MONITOR.

The last open Parliamentary nomination in LOUGHBOROUGH – and possibly in the country – takes place in the MARKET PLACE. The successful candidate, LORD JOHN MANNERS, was so unpopular with the crowds that he had to be escorted away under guard, pelted with eggs, rabbit skins and filth of all kinds. This incident ensured that nominations would in future be held indoors, away from the public.

1869:
The CATTLE MARKET moves from DEVONSHIRE SQUARE to GRANBY STREET.

1870:
Opening of the NANPANTAN RESERVOIR and the FEARON FOUNTAIN in the MARKET PLACE marking the town’s first piped water supply.

The LOUGHBOROUGH NEWS and LOUGHBOROUGH MONITOR amalgamate to become the LOUGHBOROUGH MONITOR AND NEWS.

LOUGHBOROUGH POST OFFICE moves to BAXTER GATE.

1871:
The last COURT LEET is held in the town

The population of LOUGHBOROUGH is 11,558.

The METHODIST CHAPEL on SWAN STREET is replaced by a larger building accommodating 600. It belongs to the PRIMITIVE METHODISTS.

1872:
The WARNER SCHOOL opens.

The old PINFOLD on PINFOLD GATE is replaced by a new one on MOOR LANE.

1873:
First publication of “WILLS LOUGHBOROUGH ALMANAC, TRADE GUIDE AND STREET DIRECTORY”.

A new organ, chamber and vestry are added to the Parish Church.

1875:
LOUGHBOROUGH cricket team is defeated by a south of England team which includes WG GRACE.

A disastrous flood hits the town when NANPANTAN RESERVOIR rises by 3 feet in 30 minutes. FOREST ROAD is described as “like a rapid, roaring river”, EMMANUEL CHURCHYARD is under water and the water in SWAN STREET vestry reaches a height of 2 feet.

The old TOLL HOUSE on the corner of Cumberland Road and Ashby Road is demolished.

The PARTICULAR BAPTISTS leave their chapel on SPARROW HILL and it is taken over by the UNITED METHODIST FREE CHURCH.

1876:
The income and trust of the HICKLING CHARITY is amalgamated with the BURTON CHARITY. The HICKLING SCHOOL closes for a time.

1877:
The HICKLING SCHOOL reopens as an intermediate school, for boys.

1878:
HOLY TRINITY CHURCH on MOOR LANE is consecrated.

1879:
The GIRLS GRAMMAR SCHOOL moves from Rectory Place to BURTON WALKS.

MR FARNHAM of QUORN gives a clock to be used on the TOWN HALL.

1880:
The LOUGHBOROUGH BOARD OF HEALTH buys the Manorial Rights of LOUGHBOROUGH from JOHN DAVYS CRADOCK. The people of the town finally become Lord of themselves!

First edition of the LOUGHBOROUGH HERALD, later to be absorbed into the LOUGHBOROUGH MONITOR.

One of the last thatched timber frame houses in the centre of town is demolished. This was on the corner of FENNEL STREET and CHURCH GATE, on the site of what is now THE LEFT LEGGED PINEAPPLE.

1881:
“GREAT PAUL” is cast by TAYLOR’S BELL FOUNDRY for ST PAUL’S CATHEDRAL.

LOUGHBOROUGH AND DISTRICT BOATING CLUB is founded.

The population of LOUGHBOROUGH is 14,803.

1883:
The FALCON ENGINEERING AND CAR WORKS opens.

The CHARNWOOD FOREST RAILWAY opens out of DERBY ROAD STATION.

1884:
Drought hits LOUGHBOROUGH and NANPANTAN RESERVOIR dries up. An emergency water supply has to be obtained via filter beds in BURLEIGH BROOK. It is six weeks before a snow fall and rapid thaw eases the situation.

1885:
Death of ARCHDEACON HENRY FEARON.

The FREE LIBRARY opens on the corner of GREENCLOSE LANE.

1887:
A voluntary soup kitchen is established to help the poor and unemployed. This is to last until the outbreak of the First World War.

The town’s first steam fire engine is purchased after the destruction of the Nottingham manufacturing Company in a fire.

CLEMERSONS expands into larger premises, making it the first Department Store in LOUGHBOROUGH. They were also the first to use electric lighting, provided by their own generator.

1888:
LOUGHBOROUGH IS INCORPORATED AS THE BOROUGH OF LOUGHBOROUGH. The first Mayor of the new Borough is ALDERMAN JOSEPH GRIGGS.

1889:
BRUSH ENGINEERING opens at the FALCON WORKS.

The Mayor and Burgesses of LOUGHBOROUGH buy the TOWN HALL for the town at a cost of £5,000 – £3,812 LESS than it cost to build!.

ST PETER’S CHURCH opens in STORER ROAD.

The PHILHARMONIC HALL opens on SOUTHFIELDS ROAD.

1890:
CHURCH GATE becomes the first road in LOUGHBOROUGH to be surfaced with tarmac.

Floods badly disrupt train services on the MIDLAND LINE.

1891:
The first edition of the LOUGHBOROUGH ECHO is published as a “free sheet”.

The LOWE family take over the “GREAT HOUSE” for their antique business.

The population of LOUGHBOROUGH is 18,196.

1892:
2,000 people are now employed at CARTWRIGHT AND WARNER’s Hosiery Mill on NOTTINGHAM ROAD.

A bad fire breaks out at TAYLORS BELL FOUNDRY.

1893:
The MIDDLETON BANK building on Market Place is demolished.

1894:
LOUGHBOROUGH GIRLS GRAMMAR SCHOOL is renamed LOUGHBOROUGH HIGH SCHOOL.

LOUGHBOROUGH TOWN FOOTBALL CLUB defeats ASTON VILLA 2-1 in the Birmingham Cup in front of a crowd of 6,000. Unfortunately they went on to lose 6-1 to WEST BROMWICH ALBION in the semi-final!

The QUORN HUNT meets in the MARKET PLACE for the first time.

1895:
The generation of electricity begins in Empress Road.

1896:
The CATTLE MARKET is built in GRANBY STREET.

The NEW THEATRE on ASHBY ROAD opens with “JACK OF HEARTS”

1897:Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee

1898:
An Act is passed for the construction of BLACKBROOK RESERVOIR.

ALDERMAN GRIGGS donates the GRANBY STREET SWIMMING BATHS to the town as part of QUEEN VICTORIA’s DIAMOND JUBILEE celebrations.

1899:
The GREAT CENTRAL RAILWAY opens.

The LOUGHBOROUGH CORPORATION ACT is passed, allowing the municipal (and compulsory) take-over of gas making and supply; electricity generating and supply and the building of a tramway. Control of the GAS COMPANY costs them £102,154.

QUEEN’S PARK opens on Granby Street.

1900:
HERBERT MORRIS AND BESTERT LTD move to LOUGHBOROUGH from LONDON.

The construction of the BLACKBROOK RESERVOIR begins.
The population of LOUGHBOROUGH is 21,508.

1901:
QUEEN VICTORIA DIES AND EDWARD VII BECOMES KING